Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) & COVID-19

A dedicated space to inform the public about coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and the COVID-19 disease, curated by dedicated members of the Academy.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Coronavirus Background

Historical reference to coronavirus COVID-19 and its presence in the world.

INTRODUCTION

On December 2019, the first acute respiratory syndrome case reports appeared at the Chinese Wuhan municipality, leading to authorities to classify it as a new coronavirus that had not been associated with humans before. As the disease outbreak has quickly spread across China, without the exact source having been detected, has transmitted to a variety of nations in Asian, European, Australian, African, and North American regions, with expected extension to the entire planet.

The novel coronavirus strain and the disease caused by it received an official name on 12 February 2020, becoming the second strain of SARS and labeled as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the disease was referred to as COVID-19. This novel strain of coronavirus, with a confirmed human-to-human transmission, has become a primary concern for public health as there is minimal understanding about its mechanisms of action, its criticality, and possible treatment solutions.

As international health organizations keep close monitoring of the situation and attending to the risks involved, our Academy is honorably dedicated to addressing the event with its expert fellows members as an activity of primordial priority.


 

RISK ASSESSMENT

Source: ECDC

The main developments since the 2 March 2020 risk assessment can be summarised as follows:

  • The 14-day cumulative notification rate of COVID-19, a measure of the prevalence of active cases in the population, is 3.28 per 100 000 population in the EU/EEA as of 11 March, ranging from low rates of <0.1 to 16.3 per 100 000 in Italy and 19.8 per 100 000 in Iceland. The 14-days notification rate increased 10-fold over the last 10 days and, assuming no effect of mitigation measures, the EU/EEA and UK is predicted to reach 100 per 100 000 population (the Hubei scenario) by the end of March.
  • While early in the outbreak most cases were reported in China, currently the majority of cases reported are from outside China; and since 2 March, 51% of the cases reported were from EU/EEA countries and the UK.
  • There are increasing reports both globally and in the EU/EEA that local transmission has occurred extensively in multiple locations, without reported travel history to areas reporting community transmission and without epidemiological links to known cases [5-8].
  • As of 11 March 2020, among the 1 597 cases reported in TESSy where the place of infection was reported, 797 (50%) were reported to be infected in the reporting country, 698 (44%) were reported to have acquired infection in another European country and 102 (6%) had acquired infection outside the EU/EEA.
  • In the EU/EEA and the UK, events and locations that involve social interaction or institutional contact have been related to the development of COVID-19 clusters, including workplace interactions, religious events, festivities, health and social care settings, and travel.
  • Transmission events have been reported in hospitals, with COVID-19 cases identified among healthcare workers and patients [9,10] as well as in long-term care facilities. As of 9 March, an ongoing outbreak of COVID-19 at a long-term care facility (LTCF) with 120 residents in Washington State (United States) has had 54 residents transferred to local hospitals and 26 deaths, of which 11 were within the facility. Of the 15 that died in hospital, 13 had tested positive for COVID-19. Additionally, 70 of 180 LTCF employees reported symptoms compatible with COVID-19 [11]. In a LTCF in Île-de-France region, France, as of 10 March, authorities report an outbreak of five cases among residents, including two deaths [12].
  • Reports from some healthcare facilities in northern Italy indicate that intensive care capacity has been exceeded due to the high volume of patients requiring ventilation [13].
  • The Director General of the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic on 11 March 2020.

CHRONOLOGY

Source: ECDC

  • On 31 December 2019, the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission in Wuhan City, Hubei province, China, reported a cluster of 27 pneumonia cases (including seven severe cases) of unknown aetiology, with a common reported link to Wuhan's Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, a wholesale fish and live animal market [1].
  • The market was closed down on 1 January 2020. According to the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission, samples from the market tested positive for novel coronavirus. Cases showed symptoms such as fever, dry cough, dyspnoea; radiological findings showed bilateral lung infiltrates [2].
  • On 9 January 2020, the China CDC reported that a novel coronavirus (later named SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19) had been detected as the causative agent for 15 of the 59 cases of pneumonia [3]. On 10 January 2020, the first novel coronavirus genome sequence was made publicly available [4]. The sequence was deposited in the GenBank database (accession number MN908947) and uploaded to the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID). A preliminary analysis showed that the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) clusters with the SARS-related CoV clade and differs from the core genome of known bat CoVs.
  • By 20 January 2020, there were reports of confirmed cases from three countries outside China: Thailand, Japan and South Korea [5]. These cases had all been exported from China.
  • On 23 January 2020, Wuhan City was locked down – with all travel in and out of Wuhan prohibited – and movement inside the city was restricted [6].
  • China changed the case definition several times during the course of the outbreak, which caused uncertainty regarding the exact number of cases and the extent of the spread of the virus, and several EU/EEA countries have modified their testing strategies during the course of the outbreak to test only symptomatic or severe cases.
  • The first European case was reported from France on 24 January 2020. This case had a travel history to China [7]. In Germany, cases were reported on 28 January, related to a person visiting from China [8].
  • On 30 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared this first outbreak of novel coronavirus a ‘public health emergency of international concern’ [9]. During the following weeks, several countries implemented entry screening measures for arriving passengers from China [10]. Soon, several major airlines suspended their flights from and to China [11]. Several countries repatriated citizens living in Wuhan.
  • A large number of cases have been diagnosed on board the Diamond Princess, a cruise ship docked in the port of Yokohama, Japan. The first cases were reported on 4 February 2020; the ship was put in quarantine.
  • As of 3 March 2020, 705 cases have been identified among the ship’s passengers.  Of these cases, six died. [12]
  • On 22 February, the Italian authorities reported clusters of cases in Lombardy and additional cases from two other regions, Piedmont and Veneto. Over the following days, cases were reported from several other regions. Transmission appears to have occurred locally, in contrast to first-generation transmission from people returning from affected areas. Transmission events were also reported from hospitals, with COVID-19 cases identified among healthcare workers and patients [13]. During the following week, several European countries reported cases of COVID-19 in travellers from the affected areas in Italy, as well as cases without epidemiological links to Italy, China or other countries with ongoing transmission [13]

Since ECDC’s fifth update on novel coronavirus published on 2 March 2020,  the number of cases and deaths reported in the EU/EEA has been rising, mirroring the trends seen in China in January-early February and in northern Italy in late February. If this trend continues, based on the quick pace of growth of the epidemic observed in China and northern Italy, it is likely that similar situations may be seen in other EU/EEA Member States.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Geographic distribution of COVID-19

Learn about which locations are affected and view graphical representations of epidemiological curves.

Live Updates COVID-19 CASES
  • World 33,578,990
    World
    Confirmed: 33,578,990
    Active: 7,673,210
    Recovered: 24,898,815
    Death: 1,006,965
  • USA 7,361,889
    USA
    Confirmed: 7,361,889
    Active: 2,541,435
    Recovered: 4,610,639
    Death: 209,815
  • India 6,145,291
    India
    Confirmed: 6,145,291
    Active: 947,543
    Recovered: 5,101,397
    Death: 96,351
  • Brazil 4,748,327
    Brazil
    Confirmed: 4,748,327
    Active: 521,984
    Recovered: 4,084,182
    Death: 142,161
  • Russia 1,167,805
    Russia
    Confirmed: 1,167,805
    Active: 194,861
    Recovered: 952,399
    Death: 20,545
  • Peru 808,714
    Peru
    Confirmed: 808,714
    Active: 105,401
    Recovered: 670,989
    Death: 32,324
  • Spain 748,266
    Spain
    Confirmed: 748,266
    Active: 716,855
    Recovered: ?
    Death: 31,411
  • Mexico 733,717
    Mexico
    Confirmed: 733,717
    Active: 129,836
    Recovered: 527,278
    Death: 76,603
  • Argentina 723,132
    Argentina
    Confirmed: 723,132
    Active: 130,304
    Recovered: 576,715
    Death: 16,113
  • South Africa 671,669
    South Africa
    Confirmed: 671,669
    Active: 50,605
    Recovered: 604,478
    Death: 16,586
  • France 542,639
    France
    Confirmed: 542,639
    Active: 415,405
    Recovered: 95,426
    Death: 31,808
  • Chile 459,671
    Chile
    Confirmed: 459,671
    Active: 13,957
    Recovered: 433,016
    Death: 12,698
  • Iran 449,960
    Iran
    Confirmed: 449,960
    Active: 47,650
    Recovered: 376,531
    Death: 25,779
  • UK 439,013
    UK
    Confirmed: 439,013
    Active: 397,012
    Recovered: ?
    Death: 42,001
  • Bangladesh 362,043
    Bangladesh
    Confirmed: 362,043
    Active: 83,126
    Recovered: 273,698
    Death: 5,219
  • Saudi Arabia 333,648
    Saudi Arabia
    Confirmed: 333,648
    Active: 11,090
    Recovered: 317,846
    Death: 4,712
  • Turkey 315,845
    Turkey
    Confirmed: 315,845
    Active: 30,731
    Recovered: 277,052
    Death: 8,062
  • Pakistan 311,516
    Pakistan
    Confirmed: 311,516
    Active: 8,702
    Recovered: 296,340
    Death: 6,474
  • Italy 311,364
    Italy
    Confirmed: 311,364
    Active: 50,323
    Recovered: 225,190
    Death: 35,851
  • Germany 288,745
    Germany
    Confirmed: 288,745
    Active: 26,800
    Recovered: 252,400
    Death: 9,545
  • Indonesia 282,724
    Indonesia
    Confirmed: 282,724
    Active: 61,686
    Recovered: 210,437
    Death: 10,601
  • Ukraine 204,932
    Ukraine
    Confirmed: 204,932
    Active: 112,414
    Recovered: 88,453
    Death: 4,065
  • Canada 155,301
    Canada
    Confirmed: 155,301
    Active: 13,416
    Recovered: 132,607
    Death: 9,278
  • Qatar 125,311
    Qatar
    Confirmed: 125,311
    Active: 2,888
    Recovered: 122,209
    Death: 214
  • Belgium 115,353
    Belgium
    Confirmed: 115,353
    Active: 86,065
    Recovered: 19,301
    Death: 9,987
  • Netherlands 114,540
    Netherlands
    Confirmed: 114,540
    Active: 108,160
    Recovered: ?
    Death: 6,380
  • Dominican Republic 111,666
    Dominican Republic
    Confirmed: 111,666
    Active: 23,146
    Recovered: 86,422
    Death: 2,098
  • Sweden 90,923
    Sweden
    Confirmed: 90,923
    Active: 85,043
    Recovered: ?
    Death: 5,880
  • China 85,384
    China
    Confirmed: 85,384
    Active: 184
    Recovered: 80,566
    Death: 4,634
  • Nigeria 58,460
    Nigeria
    Confirmed: 58,460
    Active: 7,454
    Recovered: 49,895
    Death: 1,111
  • Singapore 57,742
    Singapore
    Confirmed: 57,742
    Active: 322
    Recovered: 57,393
    Death: 27
  • Switzerland 52,646
    Switzerland
    Confirmed: 52,646
    Active: 7,881
    Recovered: 42,700
    Death: 2,065
  • Australia 27,055
    Australia
    Confirmed: 27,055
    Active: 1,497
    Recovered: 24,676
    Death: 882

😷 Global Stats

33,578,990 Total Cases
1,006,965 Deaths
24,898,815 Recovered
7,673,210 Active Cases
3.0% Death %
74.1% Recovered %
States cases Confirmed cases Recovered cases Death cases
California 813257 415169 15641
Texas 777165 675753 15923
Florida 701302 296000 14043
New York 490860 393337 33229
Georgia 315281 92018 6961
Illinois 292128 206736 8858
Arizona 217510 34998 5623
North Carolina 208248 184422 3445
New Jersey 207977 170751 16225
Tennessee 193732 176030 2389
Louisiana 165091 149640 5480
Pennsylvania 161644 128597 8189
Alabama 152983 64583 2501
Ohio 152022 130859 4768
Virginia 146593 17483 3172
South Carolina 146455 70430 3337
Michigan 135702 95051 7051
Massachusetts 131072 111479 9415
Missouri 127452 21164 2178
Maryland 123880 7476 3938
Indiana 118322 92847 3591
Wisconsin 117588 96727 1283
Minnesota 97638 87330 2067
Mississippi 97049 89737 2921
Washington 89429 42477 2103
Iowa 87257 67343 1324
Oklahoma 85194 70808 1007
Arkansas 82049 73573 1329
Nevada 79191 55030 1585
Utah 71442 54530 453
Colorado 69490 30971 2044
Kentucky 66939 11787 1162
Kansas 59380 44924 644
Connecticut 57147 42026 4503
Nebraska 44578 33087 472
Idaho 40923 21796 460
Oregon 32994 5538 547
New Mexico 28985 16422 873
Rhode Island 24424 2278 1110
South Dakota 21738 17692 218
North Dakota 20983 17080 234
Delaware 20389 10577 634
West Virginia 15512 11188 337
District Of Columbia 15264 12053 624
Montana 12413 8839 174
Hawaii 12203 10215 132
New Hampshire 8208 7430 439
Alaska 7597 3393 56
Wyoming 5754 4613 50
Maine 5300 4599 140
Vermont 1745 1590 58
Puerto Rico 47422 46774 648
Guam 2390 1795 45
United States Virgin Islands 1318 1243 20
Northern Mariana Islands 70 29 2
US Military 65657 44124 96
Veteran Affairs 60494 53695 3380
Federal Prisons 16595 13879 126
Navajo Nation 10312 9757 555
Grand Princess Ship 103 0 3
Wuhan Repatriated 3 0 0
Diamond Princess Ship 46 0 0
total 7,361,889 4,610,639 209,815
Country Confirmed Recovered Death
United States 7,361,889
278
4,610,639
1003
209,815
7
India 6,145,291
2272
5,101,397
2824
96,351
N/A
Brazil 4,748,327
4,084,182
142,161
N/A
Russian Federation 1,167,805
8232
952,399
6479
20,545
160
Colombia 818,203
722,536
25,641
N/A
Peru 808,714
670,989
32,324
N/A
Spain 748,266
N/A
31,411
N/A
Mexico 733,717
3400
527,278
3447
76,603
173
Argentina 723,132
576,715
16,113
N/A
South Africa 671,669
604,478
16,586
N/A
Worldwide 33,578,990
35199
24,898,815
25714
1,006,965
832
29 Sep 2020, 10:53 AM (GMT)

COVID-19 GLOBAL STATISTICS

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Country Confirmed cases Death cases Recovered cases

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Questions & Answers

The most relevant questions about the disease COVID-19 caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus.

MEDICAL INFORMATION

What symptoms does a COVID-19 infection present?

Coronavirus can make anyone sick regardless of their age, sex, race or ethnicity. 

The virus can cause mild, flu-like symptoms such as:

  • Fever
  • Dry cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Muscular pain
  • Tiredness
  • Pneumonia in both lungs

With or without the emergency warning signs including:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Blueish lips or face

In addition to cough, fever and shortness of breath, there may be nonspecific symptoms such as sore throat, myalgia, fatigue, nausea, and diarrhea as initial symptoms in some cases.

What treatments are there for the COVID-19 disease?

Healthcare providers are focused on treating clinical symptoms, including difficulty breathing, fever, cough, tiredness, and muscle pain. As the severity of the disease intensifies, implementing therapy for oxygenation, as well as other protocols for supportive care can be of high efficiency.

When to test for COVID-19?

Your current location will address the outbreak differently, depending on its stage at the epidemiological curves and will provide different options both for testing and for other medical attention services. Circumstances will pave way for nations differently as testing and healthcare protocols are adapted to local capacities and needs.

According to the ECDC, "national authorities may decide to only test subgroups of suspected cases based on the national capacity to test, the availability of necessary equipment for testing, the level of community transmission of COVID-19, or any other criteria. As a rational approach, national authorities may consider prioritising testing in the following groups:

  • hospitalised patients with severe respiratory infections;
  • cases with acute respiratory infections in hospital or long-term care facilities;
  • patients with acute respiratory infections or influenza-like illness in certain outpatient clinics or hospitals in order to assess the extent of virus circulation in the population;
  • elderly people with underlying chronic medical conditions such as lung disease, cancer, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, renal disease, liver disease, diabetes, and immunocompromising conditions"

Where can someone get tested for COVID-19?

In case you find yourself presenting symptoms of COVID-19, do not hesitate to contact you local healthcare services by email, chat or by telephone. Further medical testing may be conducted if your healthcare provider finds a reason to and will guide you on the procedure of attention.


Who is more at risk?

Elders and people with other current medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension, for example, are at a greater risks of presenting severe symptoms.

What is the risk for children?

Evidence of COVID-19 in children have been documented to be mild and rare, as a Chinese study explains, where only 2% of the cases were under 18 years of age. The study addresses the fact that fewer than 3% of the people in the same study developed severe or critical disease.

What is the risk for women during pregnancy?

There is no evidence that the foetus carried by a pregnant woman infected with COVID-19 would be affected, meaning that the mother would not transmit the virus to the baby. Additionally, there are no evident differences suggesting pregnancy will increase the severity of the disease.

WAMS INFOGRAPHIC ON COVID-19

This infographic provides basic information on novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), how it spreads, symptoms, how to avoid catching or spreading the virus, and other useful details.




PREVENTION

You can help stop COVID-19 by knowing the signs and symptoms:

Seek medical advice if you have fever, cough or shortness of breath after having been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 or if you live in or have recently been in an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19.

What to do to prevent getting infected by COVID-19?

Simple things you can do to help keep yourself and others healthy:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use with alcohol-based solutions, gels or tissues.
  • Hand wash should be done perforce after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, after going to the bathroom and before eating or preparing food.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home when you are sick and remain at least a metre away from others infected.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

What to do if you have been in close contact with people that have COVID-19?

People who have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 or people who live in or have recently been in an area with ongoing spread are at an increased risk of exposure. Notify public health authorities in your location to be able to receive proper attention and directions on how to proceed best.

If you develop any symptoms, you should immediately call your healthcare provider for advice, mentioning that you have been in contact with someone with COVID-19.




MYTH BUSTERS

What can face masks do to protect against COVID-19?

If you are infected, the use of surgical face masks may reduce the risk of you infecting other people, but there is no evidence that face masks will effectively prevent you from being infected with the virus. In fact, it is possible that the use of face masks may even increase the risk of infection due to a false sense of security and increased contact between hands, mouth and eyes.

What efforts are being done to develop a vaccine?

There are currently no vaccines against human coronaviruses, including the virus that causes COVID-19. This is why it is very important to prevent infection and to contain further spread of the virus. The United States FDA is working with vaccine developers and other researchers and manufacturers to help expedite the development and availability of medical products such as vaccines, antibodies, and drugs to prevent COVID-19.

The development of vaccines takes time. Several pharmaceutical companies are working on vaccine candidates. It will, however, take months or years before any vaccine can be widely used, as it needs to undergo extensive testing to determine its safety and efficacy.

What protection does the influenza vaccine have against COVID-19?

Influenza and the virus that causes COVID-19 are two very different viruses and the seasonal influenza vaccine will not protect against COVID-19.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SAFETY MEASURES WHEN TRAVELLING

 

What precautions should I take if I am visiting an area of local or community transmission?

Travellers visiting areas of local or community COVID-19 transmission should adhere to strict hygiene measures, wash hands with soap and water regularly, and/or use alcohol-based hand sanitisers. Touching the face with unwashed hands should be avoided. Travellers should avoid contact with sick persons, in particular those with respiratory symptoms and fever. It should be emphasised that older people and those with underlying health conditions should take these precautionary measures very seriously.

What if I have recently been in an area of local or community transmission?

Travellers returning from areas of local or community transmission should monitor their health for 14 days. People with symptoms should contact their healthcare specialist via telephone first, and indicate their exposure and travel history before seeking medical attention in person. Symptomatic people should avoid contact with others until they have received advice from a healthcare specialist.

WHO: Coronavirus disease (COVID-2019) situation reports

 

What is the risk of infection when travelling by plane?

If it is established that a COVID-19 case has been on an airplane, other passengers who were at risk (as defined by how near they were seated to the infected passenger) will be contacted by public health authorities. Should you have questions about a flight you have taken, please contact your local health authority for advice. The risk of being infected on an airplane cannot be excluded, but is currently considered to be low for an individual traveller. The risk of being infected in an airport is similar to that of any other place where many people gather.

Why are people not being checked for COVID-19 at the airport when arriving from areas of local or community transmission?

There is evidence that checking people at the airport (known as entry screening) is not very effective in preventing the spread of the virus, especially when people do not have symptoms. It is generally considered more useful to provide those arriving at airports with clear information explaining what to do if they develop symptoms after arrival.

Where can I learn more?

Each EU/EEA country may issue specific advice to travellers to areas with local or community transmission of COVID-19. Consult your local health authority or the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to get advice tailored for residents in your setting.

For an updated list of areas of presumed community transmission, please refer to WHO situation reports for country classification.

WHO: Coronavirus disease (COVID-2019) situation reports

COVID-19 AND ANIMALS & FOOD PRODUCTS

What is the risk of COVID-19 infection from animals or animal products imported from affected areas?

There is no evidence that any of the animals or animal products authorised for entry into the European Union pose a risk to the health of EU citizens as a result of the presence of COVID-19.

What is the risk of COVID-19 infection from food products imported from affected areas?

There has been no report of transmission of COVID-19 via food and therefore there is no evidence that food items imported into the European Union in accordance with the applicable animal and public health regulations pose a risk for the health of EU citizens in relation to COVID-19. The main mode of transmission is from person to person.

What is the risk of COVID-19 infection from contact with pets and other animals in the EU?

Current research links COVID-19 to certain types of bat as the original source, but does not exclude the involvement of other animals. Several types of coronaviruses can infect animals and can be transmitted to other animals and people. There is evidence that companion animals (e.g. dogs or cats) have a risk of infection when in close contact with COVID-19 infected humans. As a general precaution, it is always wise to observe basic principles of hygiene when in contact with animals.




National information resources for the public on COVID-19

EUROPE:

 

Country Institute  Website National helplines
Austria Federal Ministry Republic of Austria: Social Affairs, Health, Care and Consumer Protection Federal sozialministerium.at +43 800 555 621
Belgium Federal Public Service: Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment info-coronavirus.be +32 800 14689
Bulgaria Ministry of Health mh.government.bg +359 2 807 87 57
Croatia Croatian Institute of Public Health hzjz.hr +385 91 468 30 32;  +385 99 468 30 01
Cyprus Ministry of Health moh.gov.cy +357 1420
Czech Republic Ministry of Health mzcr.cz +420 724 810 106; +420 725 191 367
Denmark Danish Health Authority sst.dk +45 72 22 74 59
Estonia Ministry of Social Affairs koroonaviirus.ee +372 634 6630; +372 634 1220
Finland Finnish institute for health and welfare thl.fi +358 295 535 535
France Government of the French Republic gouvernement.fr +33 800 130 000
Germany Federal Ministry of Health bundesgesundheitsministerium.de +49 30 346 465 100
Greece National Public Health Institute of Greece eody.gov.gr/ +30 210 521 2054
Hungary Hungarian Government koronavirus.gov.hu +36 6 80 277 455; +36 6 80 277 456
Iceland Directorate of Health landlaeknir.is +354 544 4113, 1700
Ireland Health Service Executive hse.ie +353 1850 24 1850
Italy Ministry of Health salute.gov.it +39 1500
Latvia Centre for the Prevention and Control of Diseases spkc.gov.lv +371 67387661
Liechtenstein Government of Liechtenstein regierung.li/coronavirus +423 230 30 30
Lithuania Ministry of Health sam.lrv.lt +370 8 618 79984
Luxembourg Ministry of Health msan.gouvernement.lu +352 8002 8080
Malta Government of Malta deputyprimeminister.gov.mt +356 21324086
Netherlands National Institute for Public Health and the Environment rivm.nl +31 800-1351
Norway Norwegian Institute of Public Health fhi.no +47 815 55 015
Poland Government of Poland gov.pl +48 800 190 590
Portugal Ministry of Health dgs.pt/corona-virus +351 808 24 24 24
Romania Ministry of Health ms.ro +40 800 800 358
Slovakia Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic uvzsr.sk +421 917 222 682
Slovenia Government of Slovenia gov.si +386 31 646 617; 080 1404*
Spain Government of Spain mscbs.gob.es Regional numbers are found here
Sweden Public Health Agency of Sweden folkhalsomyndigheten.se +46 113 13
Switzerland Federal Office of Public Health bag.admin.ch/novel-cov +41 58 463 00 00
UK Government of UK gov.uk 111 (dialled from UK)

References

  1. Wuhan City Health Committee (WCHC). Wuhan Municipal Health and Health Commission's briefing on the current pneumonia epidemic situation in our city 2019 [updated 31 December 2019, 14 January 2020].
  2. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Risk assessment: Outbreak of acute respiratory syndrome associated with a novel coronavirus, Wuhan, China; first update 2020 [updated 22 January 2020]. Stockholm: ECDC; 2020.
  3. Xinhuanet. Experts claim that a new coronavirus is identified in Wuhan 2020 [14 January 2020].
  4. Holmes E. Initial genome release of novel coronavirus 2020 [14 January 2020]. Available from: http://virological.org/t/initial-genome-release-of-novel-coronavirus/319.
  5. World Health Organization. Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) SITUATION REPORT – 1, 20 January 2020. Geneva: WHO; 2020.
  6. Du Z, Wang L, Chauchemez S, Xu X, Wang X, Cowling BJ, et al. Risk for transportation of 2019 novel coronavirus disease from Wuhan to other cities in China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2020 May.
  7. Santé publique France. Epidémie de coronavirus Covid-19 au départ de Wuhan, Chine. Paris: Santé publique France; 2020. [Cited on 14 February 2020].
  8. Bayerisches Staatsministerium für Gesundheit und Pflege. Bestätigter Coronavirus - Fall in Bayern – Infektionsschutzmaßnahmen laufen. Munich: BSfGuP; 2020.
  9. World Health Organization. Statement on the second meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Geneva: WHO; 2020.
  10. Phelan A, Katz R, Gostin L. The novel coronavirus originating in Wuhan, China: challenges for global health governance. JAMA. 2020;323(8):709-710. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.1097.
  11. Chinazzi M, Davis JT, Ajelli M, Gioanni C, Litvinova M, et al. The effect of travel restrictions on the spread of the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak. medRxiv pre-print.
  12. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Situation update, 3 March 2020. Stockholm: ECDC; 2020.
  13. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Outbreak of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID19): situation in Italy – 23 February 2020. ECDC: Stockholm; 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

WAMS’ COVID-19 PATIENT MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL

WAMS, the World Academy of Medical Sciences, as the sole official world institution of medical sciences of its kind, puts its principal aim on the task of clearly informing the public and medical audience about the infamous coronavirus COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic and its impact on global human health through its COVID-19 program and through its free digital publication "WAMS' COVID-19 Patient Management Protocol". It brings notice to the characteristics of the phenomenon in various aspects of primordial relevance as an international emergency. This task is being shared among the members of the Academy and its scientific partners across the world with a united spirit of cooperation and dedication to the adequate dissemination of information regarding COVID-19's historical background, geographical distribution, risk assessment, personal health guide, containment & prevention measures, as well as recommendations for public and private sectors to follow.

WAMS Coronavirus Safety Committee

Our dedicated members addressing the pandemic situation.

ilievasiliev2

Dr. Ilie Vasiliev, MD

First Senior Vice President
valerishev

Dr. Valeri Shevchenko, MD

Chairman of the WAMS International Board of Biotechnology/Medical Technology
ettore

Dr. Ettore Piero Valente, MD

Chairman of the WAMS European Division
azfar

Dr. M. Azfar, MS, FRCSEd, FACS

Chairman of the WAMS Middle-East and North African Division
ira2

Ira S. Pastor

Chief Global Officer
joeltraje

Dr. Joel I. Osorio, MD

Chairman of the WAMS Americas Division
alexdelaparra

Alejandro De la Parra Solomon

Member of the WAMS Executive Council
walternbini
michaelcoroneos

Dr. Michael Coroneos, FRCS, FACS

Chairman of the Education and Training Board
sergei3

Dr. Sergei Paylian, MD

Member of the WAMS Executive Council
kuohui

Dr. Kuo-Hui Su, MD

Chairman WAMS International Medical Research Council
larisaspinel

Dr. Larisa Spinei, MD, PhD

Chairwoman of the WAMS International Board of Biostatistics
gerardo

Dr. Gerardo Jiménez Sánchez, MD, PhD

Chairman of the WAMS Genomic Medicine Division
constantiniavorschi

Dr. Constantin Iavorschi MD, PhD

Chairman of the WAMS International Board of Pulmonary Medicine
elenatudor

Dr. Elena Tudor, MD, PhD

Chairwoman of the WAMS International Board of Tuberculosis
Osinakachi SQUARE white

Osinakachi Akuma Kalu

Chairman of the Council for the Youth Development of Nigeria
sergiumatcovschi

Dr. Sergiu Matcovschi, MD, PhD

Chairman of the WAMS International Board of Internal Medicine
vladimirvartanov

Dr. Vladimir Vartanov, MD, PhD

Chairman of the WAMS International Board of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care
shanin

Dr. Shahin Gavanji, MD

Chairman of the Asian Council
Jaspal

Dr. Chandanpreet Singh Jaspal, DDS, BDS

Chairman of the WAMS Dentistry Division
azizollah

Dr. Azizollah Bakhtari, MD

Chairman of the WAMS Council of Iran
douglas

Dr. Douglas Colina, MD

Chairman of the WAMS Venezuelan Council
emad

Dr. Emad Fahim, MBBS

Fellow of the Academy
fengchiho

Dr. Feng-Chi (Frank) Ho, PhD

Chairman of the WAMS Singaporean Council
drfeliciatshite

Dr. Felicia Tshite, MD, BSc, MBChB

Chairwoman of the WAMS South African Council
drfares

Dr. Youssef Fares, MD, PhD, FACS, FICS

Chairman, WAMS National Council of Lebanon
ismailburud

Dr. Ismail Burud, MD

Chairman of the WAMS Malaysian Council
2b5c9aa

Dr. M. Luisetto, MD

Chairman of the Italian Council
ricardoge

Dr. Ricardo Ge Martins, MD

Chairman of the WAMS Brazilian Council
alpha

Dr. Alpha I. Balde, MD, MS

Chairman of the WAMS Chinese Council
MirtaDAmbra

Dr. Teresa Mirta D’Ambra, MD

Chairwoman of the WAMS Argentinian Council
Lejla S

Dr. Lejla Stojanovic, MD

Chairwoman of the WAMS Council of Serbia
ericklien

Eric Klien

Honorary Member of the Academy Faculty
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